Twin Cities Software Symposium

March 8 - 10, 2019

Mark Richards

Mark Richards

Independent Software Architect, Author of Software Architecture Fundamentals

Mark Richards is an experienced, hands-on software architect involved in the architecture, design, and implementation of microservices architectures, service-oriented architectures, and distributed systems. He has been in the software industry since 1983 and has significant experience and expertise in application, integration, and enterprise architecture. Mark is the founder of DeveloperToArchitect.com, a website devoted to helping developers in the journey to software architect. He is the author of numerous technical books and videos, including several books on Microservices (O'Reilly), the Software Architecture Fundamentals video series (O’Reilly), Enterprise Messaging video series (O’Reilly), Java Message Service, 2nd Edition (O’Reilly), and a contributing author to 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know (O’Reilly). Mark has a master’s degree in computer science and numerous architect and developer certifications from IBM, Sun, The Open Group, and Oracle. He is a regular conference speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Symposium Series and has spoken at hundreds of conferences and user groups around the world on a variety of enterprise-related technical topics.

Presentations

Fri 1:15 PM Microservices Migration Patterns
Fri 3:15 PM Microservices and Distributed Data
Fri 5:00 PM The Rise and Fall of Microservices
Sat 9:00 AM Microservices Caching Strategies
Sat 11:00 AM Applying Reactive Architecture Patterns
Sat 1:30 PM Essential Software Architecture Practices
Sat 3:15 PM Choosing the Right Architecture Style

PODCASTS

Analyzing Software Architectures
November 28, 2018

"Software Architecture is the stuff you can't google." There's no one answer. 

In this episode, I interview hands-on architect, speaker and trainer,  Mark Richards. He shares some perspective on analyzing software architectures, and what it takes to continuously review and iterate on existing architectures. 

The Challenges facing Software Architects
November 2, 2016

This week I sit with Mark Richards, author of several popular books and Software Architecture as well as hit O'Reilly video series and we discuss the challenges facing our industry and how to be better.

BOOKS

Java Message Service: Creating Distributed Enterprise Applications

Java Message Service, Second Edition, is a thorough introduction to the standard API that supports "messaging" -- the software-to-software exchange of crucial data among network computers. You'll learn how JMS can help you solve many architectural challenges, such as integrating dissimilar systems and applications, increasing scalability, eliminating system bottlenecks, supporting concurrent processing, and promoting flexibility and agility.

Updated for JMS 1.1, this second edition also explains how this vendor-agnostic specification will help you write messaging-based applications using IBM's MQ, Progress Software's SonicMQ, ActiveMQ, and many other proprietary messaging services.

With Java Message Service, you will:

  • Build applications using point-to-point and publish-and-subscribe messaging models
  • Use features such as transactions and durable subscriptions to make an application reliable
  • Implement messaging within Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) using message-driven beans
  • Use JMS with RESTful applications and with the Spring application framework

Messaging is a powerful paradigm that makes it easier to uncouple different parts of an enterprise application. Java Message Service, Second Edition, will quickly teach you how to use the key technology that lies behind it.

97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

In this truly unique technical book, today's leading software architects present valuable principles on key development issues that go way beyond technology. More than four dozen architects -- including Neal Ford, Michael Nygard, and Bill de hOra -- offer advice for communicating with stakeholders, eliminating complexity, empowering developers, and many more practical lessons they've learned from years of experience. Among the 97 principles in this book, you'll find useful advice such as:

  • Don't Put Your Resume Ahead of the Requirements (Nitin Borwankar)
  • Chances Are, Your Biggest Problem Isn't Technical (Mark Ramm)
  • Communication Is King; Clarity and Leadership, Its Humble Servants (Mark Richards)
  • Simplicity Before Generality, Use Before Reuse (Kevlin Henney)
  • For the End User, the Interface Is the System (Vinayak Hegde)
  • It's Never Too Early to Think About Performance (Rebecca Parsons)

To be successful as a software architect, you need to master both business and technology. This book tells you what top software architects think is important and how they approach a project. If you want to enhance your career, 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know is essential reading.

No Fluff, Just Stuff Anthology: The 2007 Edition

Twenty-seven weekends a year, the No Fluff, Just Stuff conference rolls into another town, featuring the world's best technical speakers and writers. Up until now, you had to go to one of the shows to soak up their collective wisdom. Now, you can hold it in the palm of your hand. The No Fluff, Just Stuff Anthology represents topics presented on the tour, written by the speakers who created it. This book allows the authors the chance to go more in depth on the subjects for which they are passionate. It is guaranteed to surprise, enlighten, and broaden your understanding of the technical world in which you live.

The No Fluff, Just Stuff Symposium Series is a traveling conference series for software developers visiting 27 cities a year. No Fluff has put on over 75 symposia throughout the U.S. and Canada, with more than 12,000 attendees so far. Its success has been a result of focusing on high quality technical presentations, great speakers, and no marketing hype. Now this world-class material is available to you in print for the first time.

Java Transaction Design Strategies

Understanding how transaction management works in Java and developing an effective transaction design strategy can help to avoid data integrity problems in your applications and databases and ease the pain of inevitable system failures. This book is about how to design an effective transaction management strategy using the transaction models provided by Java-based frameworks such as EJB and Spring. Techniques, best practices, and pitfalls with each transaction model will be described. In addition, transaction design patterns will bring all these concepts and techniques together and describe how to use these models to effectively manage transactions within your EJB or Spring-based Java applications. The book covers: - The local transaction model - The programmatic transaction model - The declarative transaction model - XA Transaction Processing - Transaction Design Patterns