Twin Cities Software Symposium

March 8 - 10, 2013

Brian Sam-Bodden

Brian Sam-Bodden

CEO of Integrallis

Brian Sam-Bodden is an author, instructor, speaker and hacker that has spent over twenty years crafting software systems. He holds dual bachelor degrees from Ohio Wesleyan University in computer science and physics and heads Integrallis. He is a frequent speaker at user groups and conferences nationally and abroad. Brian is the author of “Beginning POJOs: Spring, Hibernate, JBoss and Tapestry”, co-author of the “Enterprise Java Development on a Budget: Leveraging Java Open Source Technologies” and a contributor to O'reilly's “97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know”.

Presentations

Sat 3:15 PM Cleaning up your JavaScript with CoffeeScript
Sun 9:00 AM JBoss Drools: Rule Engine Development in Java
Sun 11:00 AM JBoss Drools: Rule Engine Development in Java
Sun 2:15 PM Testing your JavaScript with Jasmine
Sun 4:00 PM Cassandra: NoSQL with teeth!

BOOKS

97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

If the projects you manage don't go as smoothly as you'd like, 97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know offers knowledge that's priceless, gained through years of trial and error. This illuminating book contains 97 short and extremely practical tips -- whether you're dealing with software or non-IT projects -- from some of the world's most experienced project managers and software developers. You'll learn how these professionals have dealt with everything from managing teams to handling project stakeholders to runaway meetings and more.

While this book highlights software projects, its wise axioms contain project management principles applicable to projects of all types in any industry. You can read the book end to end or browse to find topics that are of particular relevance to you. 97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know is both a useful reference and a source of inspiration.

Among the 97 practical tips:

  • "Clever Code Is Hard to Maintain...and Maintenance Is Everything" -- David Wood, Partner, Zepheira
  • "Every Project Manager Is a Contract Administrator" -- Fabio Teixeira de Melo, Planning Manager, Construtora Norberto Odebrecht
  • "Can Earned Value and Velocity Coexist on Reports?" -- Barbee Davis, President, Davis Consulting
  • "How Do You Define 'Finished'"? -- Brian Sam-Bodden, author, software architect
  • "The Best People to Create the Estimates Are the Ones Who Do the Work" -- Joe Zenevitch, Senior Project Manager, ThoughtWorks
  • "How to Spot a Good IT Developer" -- James Graham, independent management consultant
  • "One Deliverable, One Person" -- Alan Greenblatt, CEO, Sciova

Beginning POJOs: Lightweight Java Web Development Using Plain Old Java Objects in Spring, Hibernate, and Tapestry (Novice to Professional)

Beginning POJOs introduces you to open source lightweight web development using Plain Old Java Objects (POJOs) and the tools and frameworks that enable this. Tier by tier, this book guides you through the construction of complex but lightweight enterprise Java-based web applications. Such applications are centered around several major open source lightweight frameworks, including Spring, Hibernate, Tapestry, and JBoss (including the new lightweight JBoss Seam).



Additional support comes from the most successful and prevalent open-source tools: Eclipse and Ant, and the increasingly popular TestNG. This book is ideal if you’re new to open source and lightweight Java. You’ll learn how to build a complete enterprise Java-based web application from scratch, and how to integrate the different open source frameworks to achieve this goal. You’ll also learn techniques for rapidly developing such applications.





NOTE: The source code files to accompany this book are now hosted at https://github.com/bsbodden/techconf.

Enterprise Java Development on a Budget: Leveraging Java Open Source Technologies

Open source has had a profound effect on the Java community. Many Java open source projects have even become de-facto standards. The principal purpose of Enterprise Java Development on a Budget is to guide you through the development of a real enterprise Java application using nothing but open source Java tools, projects, and frameworks.

This book is organized by activities and by particular open source projects that can help you take on the challenges of building the different tiers of your applications. The authors also present a realistic example application that covers most areas of enterprise application development. You'll find information on how to use and configure Jboss, Ant, Xdoclet, Struts, ArgoUml, Ojb, Hibernate, Junit, Swt/Jface, and others. Not only will you learn how to use each individual tool, but you'll also understand how to use them in synergy to create robust enterprise Java applications within your budget.

Enterprise Java Development on a Budget combines coverage of best practices with information on the right open source Java tools and technologies, all of which will help support your Java development budget and goals.